Author Archives: Terry

About Terry

I am a specialist in methodological issues (discrete choice modelling) and applied areas such as quality of life and end-of-life care. Specifically: I am a recognised world expert in best-worst scaling, with a particular interest in its use in health care and public policy. Together with the inventor, Jordan Louviere, and Anthony Marley, we are completing the definitive book explaining its use, to be published by Cambridge University Press in 2014. In the meantime a good introduction to the method is provided in my paper: Flynn TN. Valuing citizen and patient preferences in health: recent developments in three types of best-worst scaling. Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research 2010; 10(3):259-267. It should be noted that maxdiff scaling and associated terms are incorrect, misleading and primarily used by marketing companies. I am also co-developer of the ICECAP-O instrument, together with Professor Joanna Coast at the University of Birmingham. I am a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Choice (CenSoC), at the University of Technology, Sydney, as Head of Social Policy and Economic Evaluation.

GLAD

I have signed up to the GLAD Study – the largest of its kind in mental health to try to understand associations between genes and depression/anxiety.

I am someone who professionally has been on the “other side of the fence” for decades – trying to recruit people, and the right type of people, to studies in attempts to help patients and further scientific knowledge. Thus I understand the need to sign up to studies, if one is eligible and I do so whenever appropriate.

I also have a very personal interest in the study – my mental health problems in recent years relating to anxiety and depression are no secret. I could probably write a patient’s guide on most antidepressants and types of talk therapy! I am in a relatively good place at the moment…..but I was only able to navigate the tortuous process of trying a multitude of treatments over a necessarily long period because I am self-employed and was always able to schedule my work in a manner that ensured I provided 100% in my work…..even though it often led to difficulties in the non-work arena.

Many people are not as fortunate – they have no flexibility in their life to undergo such tortuous “suck it and see” approaches to treatment. The GLAD study may ultimately make life easier for all of us – if we begin to understand what medications and other interventions are more or less likely to work in what patients, based on their genetic makeup, then much human misery may be avoided.

I have a purely personal desire, too, that some older treatments are rediscovered, along with the facts their side effect profiles are not half as bad as many young doctors have been taught!